Classical Music online - News, events, bios, music & videos on the web.

Classical music and opera by Classissima

Franz Schubert

Friday, June 24, 2016


Classical iconoclast

Yesterday

Vaughan Williams Weekend St John's Smith Square

Classical iconoclastRalph Vaughan Williams and Friends Weekend at St John's Smith Square, a glorious three-day celebration of British music. This follows on the success of previous SJSS weekends devoted to Schubert and Schumann.  Curated by Anna Tilbrook, the RVW/SJSS weekend features The Holst Singers, James Gilchrist, Philip Dukes, and Ensemble Elata. The Weekend runs from 7th to 9th October, but get tickets soon as they will sell fast. There's no clash with the Oxford Lieder Festival which starts the following weekend, this year featuring Schumann. Friday 7th at 7.30 : The Holst Singers conducted by Benjamin Nicholas launch the festival on Friday evening: Parry I was Glad, Stanford Beatoi quorum via, W Lloyd Weber, Howells Requiem, Holst Nunc Dimittis, and RVW's Lord thou hast been our refuge Saturday 8th at 1 pm :  RVW Songs of Travel, Elgar Salut d'amour, Frank Bridge Oh, that it were so, Rebecca Clarke Passacaglia, Quilter : Go, lovely Rose, Bantock Hebrew Melody, Ivor Gurney Ludlow and Teme Saturday 8th 4 pm : The Folk Connection  Quilter I will go with my father a-ploughing, Percy Grainger : Molly on the Shoree, RVW : Along the Field, Six Studies in English Folk Song, Winter's Willow and Linden lea, Rebecca Clarke : I'll bid my heart be still, Grainger: Handel in the Strand. Saturday 8th at 7.30 : The Spiritual Realm  RVW : Rhosymedre, Four Hymns, Orpheus with his lute, Sky above the roof, Silent Noon, Piano Quintet, Finzi : Til the Earth Outwears, Elgar : Chanson de matin, Chanson de nuit (photo above Finzi and RVW, courtesy Finzi Trust) Sunday 9th at 11.30 : The Shadow of War : Bliss Elegaic Sonnet, Ireland The Darkened valley, Butterworth : Six Songs from A Shropshire Lad, Elgar : Piano Quintet Sunday 9th at 3 pm : The Shadow of War II : Ireland ;The Soldier, Blow out, you bugles, Spring Sorrow, Elgar : Sospiri, Gurney: Severn Meadows, Lights Out, Sleep, In Flanders, By a Bierside, Howells : Elegy, RVW : On Wenlock Edge

getClassical (Ilona Oltuski)

June 21

CMS Chamber Music Encounters – on a perpetual quest for inspired music making

American cellist David Finckel and Taiwanese pianist Wu Han need no further introduction to visitors of “Chamber Music Encounters,” an intense 6-day educational chamber music workshop, and their latest brainchild featured by The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center. Culminating in a free concert performance at Alice Tully Hall, audiences shared the results of a dynamic coaching effort focused on communal mentorship between CMS’ Encounters renowned faculty and new talent. In the sessions, which implement paradigm-shifting coaching conduct based on workshops led by the late Isaac Stern, students are challenged to relate to multiple masters’ viewpoints while making the music their own. With live-streamed workshop sessions, CMS indulges even remote audiences with a behind-the-scenes peek into their chambers of music making, brimming with eagerness and motivation. Wu Han and David Finckel (Photo credit: Lisa-Marie Mazzucco) David Finckel and Wu Han, the powerhouse couple of chamber music named “Musicians of the Year” by Musical America in 2012, have spearheaded artistic leadership at CMS since 2004. Chamber Music Encounters, presented in collaboration with The Juilliard School, represents yet another educational initiative in their ever-growing New York performance series. A blend of artistic excellence and savvy entrepreneurship, the secret of this series’ enduring success is not only found in the sauce: a meaty title of largest worldwide producer and presenter of chamber music, but in the spice, as the institution has gained substantial critical acclaim for its omnipresent high standards, and inspiring artistic verve and vision. Together with Wu Han, his partner in life and music, Finckel began establishing a network of chamber music institutions during the early days of his busy touring and recording schedule with the eminent Emerson String Quartet, which he only just left in 2013. Educating young musicians has always front-lined the duo’s activities. Han and Finckel began their appointment as Artistic Directors of CMS at Lincoln Center not long after founding Music@Menlo in 2003 in San Francisco’s Bay area. Their beginnings at Lincoln Center in 2004 opened up the prospect of a dynamic bi-coastal artistic exchange. When Han was approached in 2009 to bring the culture of chamber music to Taiwan and Korea, the infinite potential of leading international artistic and educational initiatives became apparent, and the pair set off. Backed by a grant-supported effort to provide performance culture and give back to its local music community, Chamber Music Today was established in Seoul in 2011 as an annual music festival with its own Chamber Music School supported by LG. With recent enterprises that include co-commissions of new works with London’s Wigmore Hall, and the latest addition of CMS’ residence at SPAC, the artistic summer retreat of New York City Ballet and the Philadelphia Orchestra at Saratoga last year, a spider web of alliances continues to spring up throughout Europe and the US, solidifying the pair’s identities as engineers of chamber music education and collaboration. “We are chamber musicians and there is a whole new generation out there that needs to perform; that’s what we do. It’s a constant work in progress and to keep it in flux these ‘satellite’ venues, as we call them, are vitally important to the growth and emanation of the work,” explains Finckel. Hands on approach: David Finckel during an Encounter session (Photo credit: Lilian Finckel) To perform chamber music, musicians require not only the talent and technique to master great accountability for their own instruments’ parts, but they must navigate nuanced musical and inter-relational sensitivity to convincingly communicate their engagement with both the score and one another. Intimate settings showcasing each of the individual ensemble members demand immensely interpretative coherence and individual artistry. “In its original definition thought of as music performed in a private group setting for pleasure by amateur musicians ‘in their chamber,’ one may argue that the profound interplay of diverse voices virtually defines the entire canon of Western music as chamber music,” remarks Arnold Steinhardt, renowned first violinist of the Guarneri String Quartet and a student and later collaborator of Stern, during a spellbinding panel with the eminent CMS Encounters faculty. “I at least think of all musical interplay as chamber music,” he adds. Session in progress, masters discussing details, from right: violinist Arnold Steinhardt, pianist Leon Fleisher, violinist Shmuel Ashkenazi (Photo credit: Lilian Finckel) To a great extent, chamber music’s mounting success in the United States has profited from concepts expanding on it as a communal experience, and it does not come as a surprise that most mentors involved in the Encounters workshops developed their love for this – up until recently – underappreciated art form at one point or another in their lives at Marlboro’s Chamber Music School and Festival. Incorporating novices and masters in collaborative rehearsals and performances, Marlboro is a unique educational environment, and Marlboro’s alumni play a huge role in cultivating America’s greater chamber music scene, infusing it with strong musical and personal relationships forged throughout weeks spent in Vermont’s summer hills. Relating pianistic ideas: Wu Han in a workshop session at CMS Encounters, Photo credit: Lilian Finckel Wu Han fondly remembers her days at Marlboro: “I was used to performing solo repertoire and big concerti as a soloist with an orchestra. But it’s a lonely road, practicing alone, travelling alone, and when I came to Marlboro, I fell in love with the whole idea of this intimate interaction. Having to match all the strings’ colors, study the others’ scores…it’s a different process and you are not just looking at your own part, but one gets to learn the entire concept of the music and to explore it together; I am so grateful for the discovery. Opening up your own sound world and being challenged to match the other musicians’ voices changes you every time anew, you become a different pianist each time, and that goes for performing as well as for teaching.” Now with the inner-city efforts of Chamber Music Encounters, coined after the series of spirited chamber music workshops offered by the late Isaac Stern, CMS continues where Stern has left off, taking up his strategy to implement diverse artistic vision into the coaching process. Stern had commenced this path, with initial workshops held in 1994 in Jerusalem and at Carnegie Hall, and some exemplary sessions in Germany, Holland and Japan. Right up until his passing in 2001, Stern, the iconic violin virtuoso and musical activist whose personal crusade saved Carnegie Hall from looming destruction, passionately taught his workshops shoulder to shoulder with an illustrious faculty of colleagues and friends, tirelessly shaping and inspiring an entire generation of young musicians, including the attending Encounters faculty; most of the Encounters mentors have taught in collaboration with Stern; next to pianist Wu Han and violinist David Finckel, pianist Leon Fleisher, violinists Shmuel Ashkenasi, Ani Kavafian and Arnold Steinhardt, as well as Juilliard’s provost and dean Ara Guzelimian are partaking in the workshops at CMS. Relying on the same pedagogical cross-pollination of interactive teaching and learning, students are coached by multiple faculty members in various groupings. Bringing differing opinions and solutions to the table allows each student to examine facets of his or her playing in a communal quest, focusing on varying concepts, but with the universal goal of learning how to learn, and how to develop their own artistic perspectives. Close up investigation by Leon Fleisher during a workshop (Photo credit: Lilian Finckel) While different input may be confusing at times, an investigative game plan that leads to the why – instead of blindly following one-dimensional instructions of how to – certainly engages creative responsiveness. Says Wu Han: “I wished something like this had existed when I was a budding musician.” Like Finckel, Steinhardt, Fleisher, Ashkenazy and Kavafian on the faculty of Stern’s sessions, she experienced the impact of the clever concept. “It is so helpful to include some open ended discussions during one’s studies. Sometimes you realize the fruitions of a suggestion only later on. There are so many choices and if one just listens to one teacher during weekly lessons, this curiosity of exploring different possibilities may not get sparked – and then, where is the searching for answers with this incredible ‘aha’ moment that brings one to the next level and makes for a true artist’s development?” Arnold Steinhardt explains his view of what makes the experience different: “Just like in Stern’s workshops, where he was not only interested in getting to the finished product but rather looked for the kernel of truth that could stand for the general viewpoint of how to look at music, we are focusing on crucial musical elements in the students’ performance that would be easily glossed over in regular lessons, trying to cover a lot of repertoire. Here, varied outlooks can open different points of entry for further artistic exploration.” “Inquiry was at the center of Stern’s spirit,” explains Ara Guzelimian, who, comparing varying approaches through historic recordings, lectures on the differences in performance styles over time. While working with Stern, serving as artistic director of programming and education at Carnegie Hall, he says he “was hugely influenced by Stern’s unique concept of wrestling with multiple approaches. Stern did not believe in the usual master class setting, promoting submissiveness. Exploring collective inspiration was at the core of his idea of life as a musician.” Faculty and students at CMS’ Encounters (Photo credit: Lilian Finckel) This summer, 15 students were geared to experience inspirational encounters with their prominent coaches. Split up into their performance groups for four of the repertoire’s staples: Mozart’s quartet in D minor, K.421, Schubert’s Trio No.1 in B-flat major, Op.99, Beethoven’s trio in B-flat major and Brahm’s quintet in F minor, Op.34, students practiced and were coached together. The atmosphere is generously friendly, with temperamental discussions and casual jokes varying slightly depending on the different combinations of faculty members and ensemble groups. When it comes to the serious efforts dispersed behind the music stands, doubled up scores and insights shared from heartfelt convictions forged during years of firsthand experiences, there is no business as usual. During a fiery discussion, these mentors, sometimes with hands on demonstration, wild gesticulations, whistling, humming or rhythmic stomping, can sudden upon any minute detail that may unhinge or open up a world of musical ideas. The characteristic elements of Stern’s workshops continue to live on in these interactions, even during a tight schedule of coaching sessions: “Mr. Stern opposes the idea of the master class and prefers teaching with others. This is chamber teaching of chamber music,” writes Philip Setzer, violinist of the Emerson String Quartet, of his firsthand experience working with Stern in an article, published in 2000 in the New York Times. Everyone working under CMS’ Encounters faculty has been influenced by decisive moments and prolific individuals in their lives, which led them to careers in music. And while each of the coaches brings their own differently-flavored personalities and viewpoints as well as specific instrumental expertise to the sessions, it becomes obvious early on that the success of the workshops’ structural dynamic comes through its reflection on chamber music’s own distinct platform – making music in intimate collaboration, keeping it fresh for the students and the faculty. Students’ work is under scrutiny from different angles throughout the sessions. Pianists mixing into strings’ fingerings and violinists suggest the pianist’s singing tone does not project enough. Sound a little intense? Perhaps, but the insightful disagreements between coaches not only keeps the process colorful, but can lead to eye-opening realizations. Performance at Alice Tully Hall, Sahun Hong, piano; Stephen Waarts,violin; James Jeonghwan Kim, cello – Franz Schubert Trio No.1 in B-flat major, D.898, Op.99 (Photo credit: Cherylynn Tsushima) Final performance at Alice Tully Hall: Jenny Chen, piano; Petery Ilvonen, violin; Brandon Garbot, violin; Cong Wu, viola; Jiyoung Lee, cello – Johannes Brahms Quintet in F minor, Op.34 (Photo credit: Cherylynn Tsushima) A better balance between players, more expressiveness and fine-tuned changes in tempi, and coherence in color and rhythm are noticeable after each session, but the students’ most important lessons lie deeper than just surface improvements in their playing and collaboration. The students have not just been prepared to perform in a successful concert at Alice Tully Hall, which evidenced much of the sessions’ fruitful advice. They have not just partaken in a beautiful performance of a Schubert trio or a Brahms quintet. These students will remember the nods towards exploring further, and look to carry on the musical discussion they’ve become a part of in these workshops for years to come, and perhaps even inspire others in turn.




Norman Lebrecht - Slipped disc

June 21

‘He never once said a disapproving word to a student’

Michael Garady, life companion of Peter Feuchtwanger who died at the weekend , has asked us to publish his personal tribute, adjoined by Leonard Bergaman who was one of Peter’s last students. in persönlicher Nachruf auf Peter Feuchtwanger. Es gibt Menschen, die sind so lange präsent und durchdringen mit ihrem Wirken derartig viel, dass es schwer vorstellbar erscheint, dass sie eines Tages nicht mehr unter uns weilen. Bei dem im letzten Jahr verstorbenen Altbundeskanzler Helmut Schmidt war das der Fall, doch abseits der Welt der Politik gibt es Menschen , die auf ganz sanfte uneigennützige Weise die Welt zu einem besseren Ort werden lassen. Nun ist am 18.6. um Mitternacht der große Musiker und Mensch Peter Feuchtwanger gestorben. Generationen von Musikern und Scharen von Schülern verdanken ihm unendlich viel. Führt man sich die lange Liste derer vor Augen, die von ihm beeinflusst und geprägt worden sind, tauchen da Namen wie Martha Argerich, Dinorah Varsi, Youra Gouller , David Helfgott und Shura Cherkassy, um nur einige zu nennen. Doch als wäre das nicht schon staunenswert genug, sollte nicht unerwähnt bleiben, dass sich Peter Feuchtwangers segensreiches Wirken auch auf die weniger Bekannten und Begünstigten, ja mitunter weniger Begabten richtete. Und er behandelte sie alle gleich, egal ob feste Größen in der Musikwelt oder Anfänger, die keinen “Namen” haben. Es war ihm ein Anliegen, das Beste in allen seiner Schüler ans Licht zu bringen. Mit meistens wenigen Worten und sparsamen Hinweise schaffte er viel mehr als die meisten um viele Worte bemühten Klavierpädagogen. Schon seine bloße Anwesenheit und Aura hatten eine angstlösende und befreiende Wirkung. Schüler, die das erste Mal zu ihm kamen und seine Präsenz erlebten, waren verblüfft, dass eine derartige Koryphäe wie Professor Peter Feuchtwanger nicht die geringste Spur eines Egos zeigte oder gar die strenge Präsenz eines Lehrers, der seinen Schülern um jeden Preis einen Stempel aufdrücken möchte. Pädagogische Tyrannei stand ihm fern, er hatte sie schlicht nicht nötig. Vielelicht werden diese in der rauen Musikwelt raren Qualitäten, -gerade in der höchsten Liga-verständlicher , führt man sich Peter Feuchtwangers Werdegang näher vor Augen: Als Sohn eines Münchner Bankdirektors in ebenjener Stadt geboren (irgendwann in den 1930er Jahren), lernte er durch das Schicksal der Emigration schon früh das Leben von einer seiner härtesten und heikelsten Seiten kennen. Doch trotzdem hasste er nie. Er hasste nicht die Menschen, die ihm die Heimat genommen hatten, hasste nicht die Menschen, die ihn entwurzelt und seine Familie demütigen wollten und ihr nach dem Leben trachteten. Er erkannte, dass diese niedere menschliche Regung nie eine Lösung für ein Problem irgendeiner Art sein kann, sondern alles nur noch schlimmer macht . So blieb er sanft und beschloss, den Menschen zu helfen, bessere Musiker und Menschen zu werden. Und das ganz frei von allem Messianischen oder Egozentrischen. Als Kind und Jugendlicher war Peter Feuchtwanger eine phämonenale musikalische Begabung, die Ihresgleichen suchte. Entwurzelt in Palästina, begann er autodidaktisch mit dem Klavierspiel und lernte, indem er ein Gros der Klavierliteratur von einem Schallplattenspieler einen Halbton zu hoch nachspielte. Auf diese Weise entwickelte er eine einzigartige natürliche Technik des Klavierspiels, aus der er später seine weltbekannte didaktische Methode entwickeln konnte, die vielen Pianisten mit verkrampfter und ungesunder Spielweise von Sehnenscheidenentzündungen, Tennisarmen oder anderen Malaisen zu befreien vermochten und ihnen eine weitere Ausübung ihres Berufs wieder ermöglichten. Einige sehr bekannte Pianisten konsultierten ihn im Vertrauen, humorvoll pflegte er dazu zu sagen: “Das sind meine Geheimschüler.” Sehr schwer zu begreifen ist, dass Peter Feuchtwanger bis zu seinem dreizehnten Lebensjahr keine Noten lesen konnte. “Ertappt” wurde er von einem Lehrer zurück in Deutschland, als er die sogenannte “Mondscheinsonate” wie für ihn gewohnt in d-moll wiedergab , statt an dem für das Stück unerlässlichen , charakteristisch- düsteren und glutvollen cis- moll. Daraufhin begann die systematische Asubildung nach einem wirklich unorthodoxen Anfang. Seine geniale Begabung wurde in der Schweiz erkannt und gefördert, prägend waren die Zusammenarbeit mit Klavierlegende Edwin Fischer (ebenso Lehrer von Alfred Brendel) , Walter Gieseking, dem phänomenalen Interpret französisch- impressionister Musik, sowie nach eigenem Bekunden wohl der wichtigste Einfluss: die große und unvergessliche Pianistin Clara Haskil. Noch im vergangenen Jahr, während einer Taxifahrt im herbstlichen London schwärmte er von der Pianistin: “Clara Haskil war das größte Erlebnis in meinem Leben und daran hat sich fünfundfünzig Jahrenach ihrem Tod nichts geändert. Die beiden verband eine sehr natürliche Handhabung des pianistischen Spiel-Apparats und eine zunächst autodidaktische Herangehensweise. Charlie Chaplin meinte einmal, in seinem Leben wäre er nur drei Genies begegnet: Churchill, Einstein und Clara Haskil. Immer wieder sprach Peter Feuchtwanger mit Begeisterung von den Interpretationen der mittleren a- moll – Sonate D 845 von Franz Schubert oder der mittleren Beethoven- Sonate op. 31/3 in Es -Dur. Doch nicht vergessen darf man, wie wichtig die fast vergessene Tradition des Belcanto und Kunst des “Singens auf dem Klavier” für ihn waren. Wer einmal mit ihm an Chopin arbeiten konnte, wird es als Offenbarung im Gedächtnis behalten bis zum letzten Atemzug. Wohl beeinflusst durch sein Aufwachsen im Nahen Osten, zeigte Feuchtwanger schon früh ein ebenfalls großes Interesse und Begeisterung für die arabische und auch die indische Musik. Da er über eine ausgeprägte schöpferische Ader besaß, drängte es ihn schon bald zur Komposition. Den Kontrapunkt Palestrinas studierte er ebenso gründlich wie die komplizierte Rhythmik und den Stil der indischen Raga- Musik. Faszinierende Produkte dieser Auseinandersetzung sind die unvergleichlichen Klavierwerkde “Studies in Eastern Idiom” und die sehr schweren “Variations in an Eastern Idiom” von 1957. Mit diesem Wurd gewann er im gleichen jahr den Viotti- Kompositionswettbewerb, woraufhin Yehudi Menuhin auf ihn aufmerksam wurde und ein Werk für Ravi Shankar und ihn im Rahmen des “Bath Festivals” 1966 in Auftrag gab. Die besagte Kompostion wurde ein enormer Erfolg den man immer noch auf der Platte/CD “East meets West” nachhören kann. Leider fehlt dort aus unerfindlichen Gründen jeglicher Hinweis auf den Verfasser der “Raga Tilang”. Weitere Kompositionen folgten bis in die 1990er Jahre und bisher befindet sich nur ein kleiner Bruchteil verlegt im Handel. Martha Argerich äußerte sich schon früh enthusiastisch über Peter Feuchtwangers Oeuvre: “Peter Feuchtwangers Klaviermusik hat mich sehr beeindruckt aufgrund ihrer Tiefe, großen Frische und Originalität. Dies sind Qualität, die heutzutage sehr selten sind. Pianistisch gesehen sind seine Kompositionen höchst raffiniert und äußerst lohnend. Jeder Konzertpianist sollte sie in sein Repertoire aufnehmen. Dies wird verständlich, wenn man in Betracht zieht, daß Peter Feuchtwanger selbst ein wunderbarer und in jeder Beziehung außergewöhnlicher Pianist ist. ” Der junge Peter Feuchtwanger absolvierte eine glanzvolle Karriere als Pianist. Doch uns schwer wollte er sich in den erbarmungslosen Konzertbetrieb einfügen, der schon damals an die Substanz eines jeden sensiblen Menschen ging. Da er über ein außergewöhnliches, ja beängstigend gutes Gedächtnis verfügte, sei er von Agenten oft ausgenutzt worden. Das berichtete er mir vor einiger Zeit um dann verschmitzt lächelnd hinzuzufügen: “Edwin Fischer kam in die Festival- Hall und sollte op. 109 von Beethoven spielen. Dann meinte der Agent, sie spielen ja das gleiche, morgen werden sie op. 110 spielen oder gar nicht. Dann übte ich vierzehn Stunden am Vortag und als das Konzert begann, brach mir der Schweiß aus. zwar kam ich gut bis zur komplexen Fuge, dort aber musste ich schweißüberströmt tricksen. Der Kritiker schrieb danach, die Fuge sei der Höhepunkt des Konzerts gewesen”. Die rauhe Luft im Konzertbetrieb hat nicht nur ihn schon früh abgestoßen, sondern auch Kollegen wie Friedrich Gulda, Arturo Benedetti Michelangeli oder Andrej Gavrilov. So entschloss er sich, seine Laufbahn als Konzertpianist trotz großen Erfolges einzustellen und sich ganz dem Unterrichten und Komponieren zu verschreieben. Und er schien glücklich damit, selbst wenn er oft seine Trauer über den Zustand der Welt und seinen Unmut mit dem oft absurd fordernden und grausamen Musikbetrieb zum Ausdruck brachte. Niemals konnte er sich in das Korsett einer Musikschule begeben. Zwar war er Gastprofessor unter anderem ein Salzburg, jedoch zog er es vor, weltweit seine eigenen, unnachahmlichen Meisterkurse zu geben. Es herrschte immer eine äußerst familiäre ja liebevolle Atmosphäre und Peter Feuchtwanger schien stets im Nu die Eigenheiten und auch Probleme eines jeden Schülers mitfühllend- intuitiv erfasst zu haben, was bisweilen an Magie grenzte. Unzähligen Musikern mit schweren Lebensschicksalen wusste er zu helfen, an prominenstester Stelle dem Pianisten David Helfgott. Einzigartig unter Seinesgleichen war Peter Feuchtwangers bescheidenes und unprätentiöses Auftreten in der Öffentlichkeit. Gut erinnere ich mich an unser Erstaunen und Schmunzeln, als Peter Feuchtwanger in Hüde am Dümmersee bei Osnabrück im Jahr 2009 mit zwei alten Plastiktüten von SPAR , prall gefüllt mit zerknitterten Notenausgaben stand. Für seine Schüler scheute er nicht die größte Anstrengung, oft arbeitete er an Kurstagen vierzehn Stunden bis zur völligen Erschöpfung mit seinen Schülern: Ohne diese jemals mit einem Wort unter Druck zu setzen. Beschimpfungen oder missbilligende Äußerung gab es bei ihm : NIE. Es machte ihn glücklich, sein Wissen an eine riesige Schülerschar weiter zu geben und dann wie eien Saat aufgehen zu sehen. Einmal ließ er über seine Schüler die Bemerkung fallen : “Alles meine Kinder!” Und wie ein Vater oder Großvater nahm er sich wirklich allen ihm Näher stehenden Schülerinnen und Schülern an. Er machte sich ehrlich Sorgen, wenn es einmal nicht so gut lief, freute sich umso mehr , wenn sich Erfolge und Glück einstellten. Dabei war er wie schon angedeutet nie ein Mann großer Worte. Hochgebildet und belesen, fähig dazu acht sprechen zu sprechen (darunter arabisch und hebräisch) sowie durch seine Familie zutiefst in der deutschen Hochkultur verwurzelt: Ein entfernter Onkel von ihm war der Schriftsteller Lion Feuchtwanger, er selbst noch mit Thomas Mann (Besuch 1952 in Kilchberg) und Hermann Hesse (Wanderung im Tessin) und Erich Kästner persönlich vertraut. Wenn er anfing, Anekdoten aus seinem überaus reichen und bewegten Leben zum Besten zu geben, kam man oft aus dem Staunen nicht mehr heraus: Arthur Rubinstein, den er im Paris der Sechziger Jahre oft besuchte kam genauso vor wie seine Begegnung mit dem Klavier- Zauberer Vladimir Horowitz , den er einmal in New York besuchte . Fasziniert und faszinierend demonstrierte er des Öfteren, wie Horowitz ihm auf dem Boden sitzend in das Geheimnis, wie farbige Akkorde zu spielen seien, eingeweiht hatte. Peter Feuchtwangers Erfahrungsschatz war schier riesig und grenzte ans Unendliche. Bis zuletzt war es seine Leidenschaft, sein Wissen an so viele Schüler wie möglich weiterzugeben, das allerdings niemals wie ein dominanter Guru und schon gar nicht wie ein “Musikdiktator”. Bis vor wenigen Tagen konnte man sich noch direkt von dem großen Musikmeister in South Kensington, beraten zu lassen. Nun ist Peter Feuchtwanger in hohem Alter zu Hause gestorben, allerdings leider ohne sein Wunsch-Lebensalter von über hundert Jahren erreichen zu können . In seinen Schülern, die ihn sehr vermissen, lebt er vielfach weiter. Unser Migefühl gilt allen,die ihm Nahe standen, insbesondere dem australischen Maler Michael Garardy, der Peter Feuchtwanger gerade in den letzten Jahren als “life companion”eine unschätzbare Stütze war. Danke lieber Peter Feuchtwanger, der Mut und die Menschlichkeit Ihres gelebten Lebens werden vielen Menschen Vorbild sein! Leonard Bergman



Franz Schubert
(1797 – 1828)

Franz Schubert (January 31, 1797 – November 19, 1828) was an Austrian composer. Although he died at an early age, Schubert was tremendously prolific. He wrote some 600 Lieder, nine symphonies (including the famous "Unfinished Symphony"), liturgical music, operas, some incidental music, and a large body of chamber and solo piano music. Appreciation of his music during his lifetime was limited, but interest in Schubert's work increased dramatically in the decades following his death at the age of 31. Franz Liszt, Robert Schumann, Johannes Brahms and Felix Mendelssohn, among others, discovered and championed his works in the 19th Century. Today, Schubert is admired as one of the leading exponents of the early Romantic era in music and he remains one of the most frequently performed composers.



[+] More news (Franz Schubert)
Jun 23
Classical iconoclast
Jun 22
Meeting in Music
Jun 22
Google News CANADA
Jun 22
Google News IRELAND
Jun 22
Google News USA
Jun 21
getClassical (Ilo...
Jun 21
Norman Lebrecht -...
Jun 19
My Classical Notes
Jun 19
The Well-Tempered...
Jun 19
Wordpress Sphere
Jun 17
Norman Lebrecht -...
Jun 16
Wordpress Sphere
Jun 16
My Classical Notes
Jun 16
Wordpress Sphere
Jun 15
My Classical Notes
Jun 15
The Well-Tempered...
Jun 14
Guardian
Jun 13
The Well-Tempered...
Jun 10
My Classical Notes
Jun 9
Norman Lebrecht -...

Franz Schubert




Schubert on the web...



Franz Schubert »

Great composers of classical music

Ave Maria Romantism Lieder Winter Journey Symphony Serenade

Since January 2009, Classissima has simplified access to classical music and enlarged its audience.
With innovative sections, Classissima assists newbies and classical music lovers in their web experience.


Great conductors, Great performers, Great opera singers
 
Great composers of classical music
Bach
Beethoven
Brahms
Debussy
Dvorak
Handel
Mendelsohn
Mozart
Ravel
Schubert
Tchaikovsky
Verdi
Vivaldi
Wagner
[...]


Explore 10 centuries in classical music...