Classical Music online - News, events, bios, music & videos on the web.

Classical music and opera by Classissima

Franz Schubert

Friday, June 23, 2017


Classical iconoclast

June 19

Schubert, Wanderer - Florian Boesch Wigmore Hall

Classical iconoclast A summit reached at the end of a long journey : Florian Boesch and Malcolm Martineau at the Wigmore Hall, as the two year Complete Schubert Song series draws to a close. Unmistakably a high point  in the whole traverse. A well planned programme, of much loved songs performed exceptionally well, with less well known repertoire presented with intelligent flourish. Boesch and Martineau began at the peak, with Schubert's Der Wanderer D493, (1816 Schmidt von Lübeck).  "Ich komme vom Gebirge her".  A deceptively simple phrase, but delivered by Boesch with great authority, for this song is the quintessential symbol of the whole Romantic revolution.   The song is itself a journey.  The resolute beginning gives way to desolation, then to the short, lyrical rtst "Wo bist du, wo bist du, mein Geliebtes Land".  As Richard Stokes has written, the song "takes the form of a short cantata".  Boesch's flexibility allowed him to mark the transitions clearly without sacrificing the line.   In the last verse, his voice moved from firmness to despair, descending to ghostly whisper, so the last words rang out with anguished finality, connecting the last verse with the first. One of the most rewarding Der Wanderers I've ever heard, and I've heard hundreds.   With its regular, repetitive lines, Der Pilgerweise D 789 (1823). can sometimes sound undistinguished, but Boesch and Martineau brought out its depths.  The pilgrim is a beggar who struggles on though "Thread after thread is torn from the fabric of his happiness". So why carry on ? No mention of religious faith in this text, written by Schubert's raffish friend Franz von Schober.  Perhaps this pilgrim is the epitome of an artist, driven to create.  He's poor but has the gift of song. Boesch coloured the words with gentleness, suggesting quiet strength.   Rewarded be, those who hear the song so well interpreted. In  Der Wanderer an den Mond D870 (1826, Seidl), Martineau depicted the steady tramping pace in the piano part, over which the vocal lines floats  with carefree lyricism.  In some ways, this song is the opposite of Der Wanderer.  In the context of this programme, we were looking backwards before moving forward.  I had wondered why Boesch's body language had become quite jaunty towards the end of Der Wanderer an den Mond.  This fitted the upbeat mood, but was also proved a good introduction to An den Mond (D468 (1816,Hölty)  Provocatively, Boesch spoke a few words before starting. "What's this song about ? Who,is dead, the girl, or the man ?"  It's a curious poem, with an unidentified protagonist gazing down from the sky. Who is weeping on who's grave ?  A stimulating approach. There's no reason Lieder should be grim and stiff. Perhaps this was a song Schubert played in the company of friends, enjoying themselves for sheer pleasure.  Two more happy songs: Der Zufriedene D320 (!815, Reissig) and Der Weiberfreund D271 (1815, Abraham Cowley, translated Ratschky).  The first concise and pointed, the second second risqué.  From contemporary drawings, we can assume that Liederabend audiences were open minded.  Endless variety: the pious An Die Natur D372 (1815-6, Stolberg-Stolberg), with Bundeslied D258 (1815, Goethe0. Schubert treats this as drinking song, while Beethoven, setting the same text, makes connections to the drinking clubs of then time which fueled political action. Thus Boesch and Martineau ended the set with Lacheln und Weinen D777 (1823, Rückert).  Laughter and tears - the landscape of Lieder is vast and varied. Der Seig D805, (1824 Mayerhofer) is an anthem, but its brave front is disguised by references to classical antiquity.  The protagonist has slain the Sphinx. The song  resumes in repose ("O unbewölktes Leben !") but the way Boesch sang the critical linen "Und meine Hand - sie traf" haunted the peace with a sense of horror.  Two songs of Spring, Frühlingsglaube D686 (1820 Uhland) and Im Frühling with An den Schlaf D447 (1816, anon) and Abendstern D 806 (1824 Mayerhofer), beautifully articulated by Boesch and Martineau. This set of songs was balanced by the final set, with Prometheus D674 (1819 Goethe) and Grenzen der Menschheit D716 (1821 Goethe) , powerful songs which Boesch van sing with authority, all the more moving because his approach can evoke more sensitive feelings. Limitations of mankind, for men are human, not gods.  Thus the unforced elegance of Boesch's An den Mind D296 (1819, Goethe and the tenderness in then two "motherhood" songs, Grablied für die Mutter D616 (1818 anon) and Die Mutter Erde D788 (1823 Stolberg-Stolberg).  It's surprising that this song isn't done more often as it exemplifies many of the themes in this Wanderer journey.  The piano introduction is finely poised, suggesting slow footsteps "schwer und schwül".  In the moonlight, someone is being buried.  Diminuendos and a minor key, but the mood is "erhellt von sanfter Hoffnungn Schein"  Mother Earth holds us all.  Death ,does not triumph.   This concert was being recorded live. If it's released, this song will be one of the highlights.  Boesch and Martineau's encores were An den Mond D296 (Goethe) and Nachtviolen D752 (!824 Mayrhofer).

My Classical Notes

June 16

Dragon Quartet Performs Schubert and Dvorak

Dvorak: String Quartet No. 12 in F major, Op. 96 ‘American’ Schubert: String Quartet No. 14 in D minor, D810 ‘Death and the Maiden’ Performed by the Dragon Quartet The Dragon String Quartet is an ensemble that was formed in 2012 of four celebrated, young Chinese musicians: first violinist Ning Feng, second violinist Wang Xiaomao, violist Zheng Wenxiao and cellist Qin Liwei. Ning Feng and Qin Liwei, both internationally established Chinese soloists, came up with the idea of forming a string quartet after a series of concerts that brought them together. Wang Xiaomao is concertmaster of China National Ballet Orchestra, Zheng Wenxiao is Principal Viola of Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra (Symphonie orchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks). The Dragon String Quartet performs around the world regularly, introducing the masterworks of string quartet to the audiences, rediscovering rarely performed but outstanding pieces, and promoting contemporary works especially the great pieces created by Chinese composers. Here is Schubert’s Death and the Maiden quartet:






Franz Schubert
(1797 – 1828)

Franz Schubert (January 31, 1797 – November 19, 1828) was an Austrian composer. Although he died at an early age, Schubert was tremendously prolific. He wrote some 600 Lieder, nine symphonies (including the famous "Unfinished Symphony"), liturgical music, operas, some incidental music, and a large body of chamber and solo piano music. Appreciation of his music during his lifetime was limited, but interest in Schubert's work increased dramatically in the decades following his death at the age of 31. Franz Liszt, Robert Schumann, Johannes Brahms and Felix Mendelssohn, among others, discovered and championed his works in the 19th Century. Today, Schubert is admired as one of the leading exponents of the early Romantic era in music and he remains one of the most frequently performed composers.



[+] More news (Franz Schubert)
Jun 20
Wordpress Sphere
Jun 19
Classical iconoclast
Jun 16
My Classical Notes
Jun 16
The Well-Tempered...
Jun 15
The Well-Tempered...
Jun 14
Google News CANADA
Jun 14
Google News AUSTR...
Jun 14
Google News IRELAND
Jun 14
Google News UK
Jun 13
The Well-Tempered...
Jun 12
Wordpress Sphere
Jun 11
Wordpress Sphere
Jun 11
Meeting in Music
Jun 10
My Classical Notes
Jun 8
Wordpress Sphere
Jun 7
Wordpress Sphere
Jun 6
Wordpress Sphere
Jun 4
All the conductin...
Jun 3
My Classical Notes
Jun 3
The Well-Tempered...

Franz Schubert




Schubert on the web...



Franz Schubert »

Great composers of classical music

Ave Maria Romantism Lieder Winter Journey Symphony Serenade

Since January 2009, Classissima has simplified access to classical music and enlarged its audience.
With innovative sections, Classissima assists newbies and classical music lovers in their web experience.


Great conductors, Great performers, Great opera singers
 
Great composers of classical music
Bach
Beethoven
Brahms
Debussy
Dvorak
Handel
Mendelsohn
Mozart
Ravel
Schubert
Tchaikovsky
Verdi
Vivaldi
Wagner
[...]


Explore 10 centuries in classical music...